Welcome to NancyKleinMaguire.com

My Blog

Being a Death Coach

Everyone understands the term “midwife,” but there is no term for describing the person who travels with the terminally ill ...
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A Morning at Garth Newel

August 7, 2018 Tuesday afternoon, and I just returned from Garth Newel. I arrived there around 11 AM and watched ...
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The Ultimate Choice

No matter how we would like to deny it, we all will die. But, unless we have a heart attack ...
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Records of Dying

We received the deadly diagnosis on September 23, 2013. By the next month, I had started recording our conversations. In ...
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The Death Date

Today, May 18, 2018, is David’s third death date. The term “death date” assumes huge proportions. The first year, I ...
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Yes, Roz, Death Is Not Pleasant

When The New York Times published an early excerpt from Roz Chast’s Can’t we talk about something more PLEASANT?, I ...
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Dying, Slowly

People do not understand dying at all. In our case, dying was very, very slow. Knowing you’re going to die ...
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My Job

In September, 2013, when my husband David got a deadly diagnosis with a prognosis of 12 to 15 months, maybe ...
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An Infinity of Little Hours

An Infinity of Little Hours: Today, if you enter the grounds of the Carthusian Charterhouse at Parkminster, England, you will walk up a long path until you reach the heavy, double-oak doors of the main entrance.

You will pull the bell rope and wait expectantly.

An Infinity of Little Hours

An Infinity of Little Hours

After a long pause, you will hear the rasping sound of metal on wood as a bolt is pulled back …  and…  ever so slowly…   a small window in one of the doors opens.

You will dimly see the brother Porter of Parkminster. His job is to keep outsiders from the inner sanctum, to protect the solitude of each monk.

“No visitors are allowed,” he will say, if you don’t have an appointment.

But, since you are inquiring about the book, An Infinity of Little Hours, you do have an appointment.

I invite you to join the many readers who have explored the secret life inside the Charterhouse. One reader called it a page turner, another the very best sort of psychological thriller, or a stunner of a book. A New York literary agent said it “knocked my socks off”. Don’t believe me. You can read their comments in the review section of this website. And, twelve years later, the book is still selling and still being reviewed.

Join us,

Nancy Klein Maguire